Eimeria tenella is probably the most diagnosed Eimeria on the planet, but what is the prevalence of the other Eimeria species that cause coccidiosis in poultry?

Eimeria tenella is by far the most widely detected species on farms when routine lesion scoring is performed. However, it is well known that Eimeria infections very seldom occur with one single species of Eimeria, most of the time they are multiple. Let’s investigate what are the most prevalent species and how multiple infections usually occur.

E-tenella-3rd-degree-lesion

As Eimeria tenella is probably the easiest species to detect by lesion scoring, a common belief is that this species is the most prevalent all over the globe. In fact, macroscopic lesions are amongst the most pathognomonic with blood or typical moulds in the caecum and common finding of bloody droppings in the litter.

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Eimeria praecox: a brief story of the big unknown of coccidiosis in poultry

Seven species of Eimeria (E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. maxima, E. mitis, E. necatrix, E. praecox and E. tenella) are recognized to be causative agents of coccidiosis in chickens of the genus Gallus gallus. Until recently, Eimeria praecox was considered to be a non-pathogenic species unable to cause adverse effects in the host.

E.-praecox-in-the-duodenum

In fact, in 1970, when Johnson & Reid wrote the milestone article that for the first time standardized and described the scoring scale for lesions caused by all Eimeria spp., Eimeria praecox was not included. It was, and still is, well know that E. praecox is not able to provoke pathognomonic lesions like E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. maxima, E. necatrix and E. tenella, however even then some researchers were investigating whether this species of Eimeria was truly non-pathogenic.

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Coccidiosis in poultry: an objective assessment of the incorporation of a rotation programme using precocious attenuated vaccines

Within the scope of assessing new strategies for the control of coccidiosis in poultry, the first factors to consider are always immunological and physiological but also include less objective factors such as the management. However, when these new strategies come to be assessed, the exercise has to be carried out in perspective by evaluating those indicators that are the most critical in order to decide whether maintaining such strategies or to replacing them with others. In the production of broiler chickens, these indicators are solely productive.

Total-Mean-Lesion-Score-(TMLS)Live precocious attenuated vaccines for coccidiosis in poultry like HIPRACOX® have been used in numerous countries and situations, and these experiences serve to support the implementation of vaccine rotation programmes for the control of coccidiosis in poultry.

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How an adjuvant can modulate the immune response against coccidiosis in poultry

EVALON® is a live coccidiosis vaccine against avian coccidiosis in poultry composed of E. acervulina, E. brunetti, E. maxima, E. necatrix and E. tenella. All the strains have been selected to maximize immunogenicity. Avian Eimeria have a complex life cycle with a combination of exogenous and endogenous stages that trigger the immune system of the host. However, Eimeria parasites have also been described as being highly elusive to the immune system as well as producing chemokines than can slow or inhibit the immune response (Jang 2011, Schmid 2014, Miska 2013).

Levels-of-IL-2-in-animals-vaccinated-against-coccidiosisAlthough it is well known that live vaccines can induce an adequate immunity, we strongly believe that immune modulation is crucial in providing a strong, fast and long-lasting immunity (Dalloul 2005). This could be essential in the prevention of coccidiosis in poultry.

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Immunology in coccidiosis in chickens: The role of cytokines IL-2 and IFN-gamma

The cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to immune protection against coccidiosis in chickens are complex and include multiple aspects of innate and adaptive immunity. Innate immunity is mediated by subpopulations of immune cells that recognize pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Adaptive immunity, which is important in conferring protection against secondary infections, involves subtypes of T and B lymphocytes that mediate antigen specific immune response. Experimental studies in coccidiosis in chickens now support the role of lymphocytes and their secreted products (Lillehoj et al. 2011)

Intracellular-vs-Extracellular-pathogenEimeria parasites have a long and complex biological cycle with exogenous and endogenous phases that trigger the immune system of the host. These parasites that cause coccidiosis in chickens can produce substances (chemokines) than can inhibit the immune response.

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Contribution of DNA-based diagnostic methods to the treatment of coccidiosis in poultry. What’s New?

In the fight against infectious diseases, the first step is the correct identification of the causative agent, and the symptoms and lesions that it causes in the host. A correct diagnosis influences on the effectiveness of the treatment established, particularly if it is combined with preventive measures such as vaccination. Traditional techniques such as microscopic observation and oocysts counting remain very useful as screening methods, and an aid in the diagnosis and treatment of coccidiosis in animals. DNA-based methods such as PCR have overcome some limitations of these conventional methods, allowing the analysis of more samples in less time, increasing sensitivity and allowing the quantification of the parasite in one step.


These new methods positively influence the treatment of coccidiosis, expanding the possibilities for the poultry veterinarian to control the disease.

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New strategies for the control of coccidiosis in poultry: rotation programmes with vaccines against Eimeria

From the very beginnings of this type of animal production, control of digestive diseases in the poultry industry has been one of the most significant health challenges. Moreover, among digestive diseases, coccidiosis in poultry continues to pose a challenge for the poultry farming worldwide. The incorporation of new tools provides new resources for safe and effective control.

Benefits of including coccidiosis vaccines in rotation programmesWhere are we coming from?

The housing conditions of birds used in production constitute a trigger factor for digestive diseases, with coccidiosis in poultry being one of the most prevalent, caused by parasites of the Eimeria genus.

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Eimeria immunogenicity, basic information and protection conferred by a precocious line of Eimeria necatrix.

Eimeria spp is a protozoan parasite with a complex life cycle and so is the host immune response to Eimeria infection. In the last decade, huge progress has been made in the identification of host and parasite genes involved in immunogenicity but there are still some immunity mechanisms to be discovered.

 

As a general rule, we say that Eimeria immunity is species-specific, meaning that each species of Eimeria is able to stimulate protective immunity against itself. Although some studies suggest that partial cross-protection can be achieved (Augustine et al. 1991), from a practical perspective we have to assume the widely accepted belief that there is no cross-protection between species.

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Coarse spray application of a coccidia vaccine for correct oocyst ingestion

Proper oocyst distribution is a key point for the success of spray application of a coccidia vaccine. Generally speaking, a coccidia vaccine is a suspension of sporulated oocysts in a PBS solution. Because of this fact and because of the characteristics of the oocysts, there are some differences to a common viral freeze-dried vaccine that must be taken into account during the vaccination process.

There are several methods by which coccidia vaccines can be applied, but probably the most convenient, consistent, reliable and accurate way is via coarse spray in the hatchery. Spraying the vaccine directly on to the feed risks desiccating the oocysts and that is one of the few weak points of oocysts.

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Can we enhance pecking and preening for oocyst ingestion in coarse spray vaccination against coccidiosis?

Uniform ingestion of coccidiosis vaccines made of attenuated sporulated oocysts is of paramount importance for the correct intake of these vaccines and subsequent onset of immunity and has to take place soon after the vaccine is coarse sprayed over the chicks. In order to achieve this, we need to enhance the pecking and preening behaviour of the chicks with the help of a colour and an aroma.

 

The application of vaccines via coarse spray was conceived mainly for the oral administration of coccidiosis vaccines made of sporulated oocysts.

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