Eimeria tenella is probably the most diagnosed Eimeria on the planet, but what is the prevalence of the other Eimeria species that cause coccidiosis in poultry?

Eimeria tenella is by far the most widely detected species on farms when routine lesion scoring is performed. However, it is well known that Eimeria infections very seldom occur with one single species of Eimeria, most of the time they are multiple. Let’s investigate what are the most prevalent species and how multiple infections usually occur.

E-tenella-3rd-degree-lesion

As Eimeria tenella is probably the easiest species to detect by lesion scoring, a common belief is that this species is the most prevalent all over the globe. In fact, macroscopic lesions are amongst the most pathognomonic with blood or typical moulds in the caecum and common finding of bloody droppings in the litter.

Continue reading Eimeria tenella is probably the most diagnosed Eimeria on the planet, but what is the prevalence of the other Eimeria species that cause coccidiosis in poultry?

Eimeria species in long life-cycle birds: focus on Eimeria tenella

Avian coccidiosis is a common protozoal gastrointestinal parasitosis caused by the Eimeria species resulting in considerable economic losses in the poultry industry, especially in long life-cycle birds such as layers and breeders. In these high value birds, Eimeria species infection results in clinical or subclinical coccidiosis associated with increased mortality, decreased flock uniformity and a general rise in secondary pathologies subsequent to intestinal damage. Without any doubt, the best known and most widely diagnosed species is Eimeria tenella.

E-Tenella-23-Junio-AMicroscopic picture of the five Eimeria species included in EVALON®: Eimeria acervulina, Eimeria brunetti, Eimeria maxima, Eimeria necatrix and Eimeria tenella.

Chickens are susceptible to seven Eimeria species, the most common species affecting long-life birds being Eimeria tenella, Eimeria necatrix, Eimeria brunetti, Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria maxima.

Continue reading Eimeria species in long life-cycle birds: focus on Eimeria tenella